Tag Archives: Section 101

USPTO Update on Patent-Eligibility for Life Science Inventions

On August 2nd 2017, the USPTO hosted a Bicoastal Biotechnology/Chemical/Pharmaceutical Customer Partnership that focused on the USPTO’s current thinking on patent-eligibility. The meeting followed the USPTO’s June 25th, 2017 publication of its report “Patent Eligible Subject Matter: Report on Views and Recommendations from the Public” (“Report”) which summarized the case law, international approaches to defining … Continue reading this entry

FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S RECENT PRIMER ON PATENT-ELIGIBILITY

A method of producing a desired population of multi-cryopreserved hepatocytes was held to be patent-eligible because the challenged claims did not recite a judicial exception. Rapid Litig. v. CellzDirect, Inc.., 2015-1570 (Fed. Cir., July 5th 2016). The decision provides much needed guidance to the life science industry that had yet to receive positive guidance from … Continue reading this entry

Supreme Court Declines Sequenom Review

Last week the United States Supreme Court denied Sequenom’s petition to review the Federal Circuit’s holding in Sequenom Inc. v. Ariosa Diagnostic Inc., 788 F.3d 1371 (2015) that claims directed to detecting fetal DNA in maternal blood were invalid for failing to recite patent eligible subject matter. Therefore by default, the Court let stand the … Continue reading this entry

Will the Supreme Court Clarify Patent-Eligibility?

The United States Supreme Court is set to render its decision on the grant or denial of Sequenom, Inc.’s (“Sequenom’s”) petition for writ of certiorari that posed the issue: Whether a novel method is patent-eligible where: (1) a researcher is the first to discover a natural phenomenon; (2) that unique knowledge motivates him to apply … Continue reading this entry

ANOTHER DIAGNOSTIC PATENT FALLS UNDER 101

In Genetic Techs Ltd v Merial LLC (Fed. Cir., April 8, 2016), the Federal Circuit invalidated yet another diagnostic patent for failing to satisfy 35 U.S.C. § 101 on the ground that the claims recite nothing more than a law of nature. The claim’s recitation of the term “to detect the allele” was insufficient to … Continue reading this entry

An Early Test for the USPTO’S Eligibility Analysis

Just last week, the USPTO released its revised subject matter eligibility guidance (2014 Interim Guidance on Patent Subject Matter Eligibility “Interim Guidance” reviewed in my prior post of December 16th, 2014). The Interim Guidance replaced the March 2014 Guidance that was much-criticized for its expansive application of U.S. Supreme Court jurisprudence relating to the judicial … Continue reading this entry

Canada Joins the Gene Patenting Debate

Canada has joined the gene patenting debate. Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (“Children’s”) sued the University of Utah Research Foundation, Genzyme Genetics, and Yale University (“Defendants”) in Canada’s Federal Court asserting that 5 patents[1] assigned to Defendants (collectively the “Long QT Patents”) for compositions and methods useful in the diagnosis and/or assessment of Long QT syndrome … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit’s Post-Alice Eligibility Analysis of Business Methods

PatentEligibility
The Federal Circuit in Ultramercial, Inc. v. WildTangent, Inc., held that an “entrepreneurial” multi-step process for distributing copyrighted media products over the Internet to consumers is not patent-eligible under 35 U.S.C. § 101 even though the specific method of advertising and content distribution was neither previously known nor employed on the Internet. Although the patent … Continue reading this entry

Myriad’s Continuing Patent Debate

On October 6, 2014, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit entertained oral argument in the interlocutory appeal of the district court’s denial of Myriad’s motion for preliminary injunction against Ambry Genetics. In re BRCA1- and BRCA2- Based Hereditary Cancer Test Patent Litigation, Case Nos. 14-1361, -1366. If you missed oral argument, the … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Frames Test for Patent-Eligibility

PatentEligibility
Personalized medicine relies on diagnostics to analyze a patient for individualized therapy and for monitoring a patient’s health status. Some diagnostic tests use natural products, for example gene sequences, either as the target of the diagnostic test or as a tool to identify a genetic trait or anomaly. Personalized medicine also may rely on the … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Dismisses WARF Stem Cell Case – A Missed Opportunity

Recently in Consumer Watchdog v. Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, No. 2013-1377 (Fed. Cir. 2014), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (Federal Circuit) dismissed Appellant Consumer Watchdog’s appeal on the ground that as a party, it lacked Article III standing. While the court’s decision raises interesting issues regarding litigation strategy, dismissal of the appeal … Continue reading this entry

Top Twelve Practice Tips Following Myriad and Prometheus

*  Written by Kristel Schorr and Jackie Wright Bonilla, both partners in the Washington, DC office of Foley & Lardner LLP As most in the biotech industry know by now, the Federal Circuit recently issued its decision in Assn. Molec. Path. et al. v. USPTO et al., a case otherwise known as Myriad or the … Continue reading this entry

Myriad's Gene Patenting Debate Continues

Late last week the Federal Circuit issued its much anticipated opinion – Assn. Molec. Path. et al. v. USPTO et al. – which addressed, inter alia, the issue of whether and to what extent is genetic material patent-eligible. Judge Lourie, writing for the majority, held that isolated genetic material is patent-eligible. Judge Moore concurred-in-part that isolated … Continue reading this entry