Tag Archives: Gene Patents

3 Pressing Challenges for Personalized Medicine

Personalized medicine can be described as the science of targeted therapies. Advances in diagnostic and molecular medicine have made it possible to more precisely identify alternative treatment options for patients based on their unique genetic or clinical profiles. According to an article published by the FDA in the spring of 2015 (FDA Continues to Lead … Continue reading this entry

Fed. Cir. Denies Myriad's Petition for Rehearing in Gene Patenting Case

We previously reported that the ACLU and Myriad each filed a Petition for Panel Rehearing with the Federal Circuit for review of the July 29, 2011 decision, Assn. Molec. Path. et al. v. USPTO et al. This dispute, now known as the “gene patenting case,” reviewed whether isolated genetic material and diagnostic tests that rely on … Continue reading this entry

ACLU and Myriad Both Petition for Panel Rehearing In Myriad "Gene Patenting" Case

On August 25, 2011, on behalf of Plaintiffs, the ACLU filed a Petition for Panel Rehearing with the Federal Circuit in Assn. Molec. Path. et al. v. USPTO et al., known as the Myriad “gene patenting” case. Four days later, on August 29, 2011, Myriad likewise filed its own Petition for Panel Rehearing. Both parties … Continue reading this entry

Top Twelve Practice Tips Following Myriad and Prometheus

*  Written by Kristel Schorr and Jackie Wright Bonilla, both partners in the Washington, DC office of Foley & Lardner LLP As most in the biotech industry know by now, the Federal Circuit recently issued its decision in Assn. Molec. Path. et al. v. USPTO et al., a case otherwise known as Myriad or the … Continue reading this entry

Myriad's Gene Patenting Debate Continues

Late last week the Federal Circuit issued its much anticipated opinion – Assn. Molec. Path. et al. v. USPTO et al. – which addressed, inter alia, the issue of whether and to what extent is genetic material patent-eligible. Judge Lourie, writing for the majority, held that isolated genetic material is patent-eligible. Judge Moore concurred-in-part that isolated … Continue reading this entry